ABOUT
THE PERFORMANCE LAB

Our Story

it all started...

The Performance Lab was started with a passion to bring high-quality, data-driven, intelligent training to the community of Wake Forest, RTP, and world of sports. I believe that every athlete should have access to high level coaching and elite level training, and a lot of places I have been these two are lacking if not completely absent. I don’t believe that I have all the answers, but what I do know  is that I have a passion to try and understand as much as I can and maintain a growth mindset throughout; to know more and to know better. It's why we believe that, "If better is possible, good is not enough."

One of my favorite quotes is from the late physicist, Dr. Richard Feynman; "Being wrong isn't a bad thing...It is an opportunity to learn something." For us, we are not afraid of being wrong. However, we do fear not knowing a better way to do something. My experiences have shown me a world in sports and fitness that is archaic, where most people are living by the principles of "this is how it’s always been done" or "this is how I was taught to do it" or "it worked for me." At the Performance Lab we say, “This may be how it has always been done, but is there a better way?”

At The Performance Lab we use data to drive the way we train and develop our athletes. "Complacency is the act of non-action driven by negative fear." It is okay to be afraid. It is not okay to allow that fear to stop growth.

Passion is the willingness to suffer and sacrifice for something greater than yourself.

if better is possible, good is not enough.

At The Performance Lab, we embrace fear and failure because we know that failure means we are one step closer to success. We don’t do things perfectly here; we don’t believe there is such thing as perfect. But, we are doing better, because good is not enough.
1. Athlete First Approach

Do No Harm

Our main priority is the development of the athlete in a risk-adjusted setting. This is what we call intelligent work. It means that when we are training athletes to perform at high levels, there is inherent risk that comes with that, however, we consider the risks verses the rewards when selecting the exercises we do, the intensity and volumes that we train at, as well as the progressions of movements, so that the athlete gets the development they need to perform at the level their sport demands of them. As elite spring coach Henk Kraaijenhof says, “Try to find the right program for you athlete, not the right athlete for your program.”

2. Character Drives Culture

Integrity

High character creates a high culture. This begins with us as coaches and trickles down to our athletes. Integrity is a character trait that is humble and proud. Humility is not thinking less of yourself but thinking of yourself less. It considers others first, and self last. At the same time pride is not boasting in yourself but considering everything you do has meaning and worth. It's considering everything you do to effect everything around you. This is the culture that we seek to instill here and it starts at the top.

3. Work in Empty Rooms

Discipline

I'm not really a big fan of motivation and the reason for that is because motivation is temporary and it usually appeals to the emotions. I prefer discipline because when the motivation to do something isn't there, you are less likely to do it, but if you are disciplined then you are more likely to do something you may not feel like doing because you know it is necessary. Discipline can create work ethic and habits that can last someone a lifetime. Motivation can only produce a temporary response. I love the saying from Lantz Wheeler, "doing work in empty rooms" because motivation is absent in that moment; the only thing present is passion and discipline.

4. Pressing on Amidst Adversity and Failure

PERSISTENCE

Success does not come from a single attempt at something, but from many, if not hundreds or thousands of attempts. Winston Churchill said it best when he said, "Success is the ability to go from one failure to the next without losing enthusiasm." Great athletes don't quit when they fail nor do they move on when they have one successful attempt. They continue to develop; they practice consistently until the ratio between failure and success is inverted and you succeed more than you fail. No athlete never fails. It's not about not failing. It's about getting up and moving forward even when you fail.

5. If You're Not Assessing, You're Guessing

Data-Driven

I'm not really a big fan of motivation and the reason for that is because motivation is temporary and it usually appeals to the emotions. I prefer discipline because when the motivation to do something isn't there, you are less likely to do it, but if you are disciplined then you are more likely to do something you may not feel like doing because you know it is necessary. Discipline can create work ethic and habits that can last someone a lifetime. Motivation can only produce a temporary response. I love the saying from Lantz Wheeler, "doing work in empty rooms" because motivation is absent in that moment; the only thing present is passion and discipline.